Month: August 2018

BC Wildfire Relief Urgently Required

Dear Rotary Club of Lions Gate Members and Friends of Rotary ,

In the past week we have had a number of urgent requests via Darcy Long our 2018 -2019 District Governor to provide help and any support that we can as club, to both firefighters and the evacuees affected by the terrible wildfire destruction presently occurring in BC .

While we as a club have agreed to donate $ 500, we wanted to extend the invitation to all of our members the opportunity to also make a donation through the Rotary Club Lions Gate (RCLG) Foundation (which will provide a tax receipt for whatever amount you wish to donate). This fundraising campaign will remain open until September 14th, 2018, after which we be providing a cheque that will directly support the wildfire victims in the affected and the surrounding communities. All donations will be made on behalf of the Rotary Club of Lions Gate Foundation.

Donations can be made in one of four ways :

  • Via the donate button on the top of our website, or click here,
  • At one of The Rotary Lions Gate luncheon meetings on either the 7th and or 14 th September,
  • Mail it the RCLG at: Rotary Club Lions Gate, PO Box 38616, North Vancouver, BC, V7M 3N1.
  • Failing any of the above you are welcome to email us at: info@rotarylionsgate.com, and we can arrange a pickup.

Thanks for your support to this very worthwhile cause.

____

Roger K Thomey P.Eng
Director of Community Affairs
Rotary Club of Lions Gate
North Vancouver , BC

Rotarian helps clean rivers around the world

A challenge to clean the world’s rivers

In 2009, Salvador Rico stood in the waters of the Russian River in Northern California with other members of the Rotary Club of South Ukiah. They were there for a river cleanup, during which they removed toilets, refrigerators, car parts, and garbage. That event led to an ambitious initiative called Cleaning the Rivers of the World.

After participating in the Russian River cleanup, Rico’s thoughts turned to the Ameca River, which flows past his father’s farm in western Mexico. That was where, he believed, his oldest sister contracted the poliovirus that killed her in the 1960s. 

The Rotary clubs of Ameca, Mexico, and of Rohnert Park-Cotati and South Ukiah, California, clean up the Ameca River. “I always hoped that someday I could go home and do something to turn all the sewage into pristine waters,” says Salvador Rico, the Rotary member who organized the clean up.

“My older siblings would play in the river,” he says, “and that particular river carried sewage from the city of Tala.”

Rico also thought of another river, the Lerma, which runs near his old elementary school. His teachers would let children play in a pristine tributary that flowed from a canyon but not in the main channel of the Lerma, which carried trash and toxic waste from Guadalajara. 

So when Rico’s district governor, Helaine Campbell, asked clubs to carry out a signature water-related project in 2013-14, Rico proposed a cleanup of the Ameca River.

With the help of Vicente Paredes of the Rotary Club of San Pedro de Tlaquepaque, Mexico, who connected people and worked on logistics, the Rotary clubs of Ameca, Mexico, and of Rohnert Park-Cotati and South Ukiah, California, carried out the first Ameca River cleanup day in April 2014. They have since organized more cleanups of the river. 

That project eventually expanded to become Cleaning the Rivers of the World, which has challenged Rotary clubs across the globe to clean up a river. The initiative has been adopted by the Water & Sanitation Rotarian Action Group as part of the Annual World Water Day Challenge, as well as by the Environmental Sustainability Rotarian Action Group. Rotarians have organized cleanup projects in Colombia, India, Nigeria, Peru, Turkey, and Venezuela, as well as in other parts of Mexico and the United States.  

In 2018, Rico joined his fellow Rotarians in a project on the Lerma River. “As a kid, I always hoped that someday I could go home and do something to turn all the sewage into pristine waters,” he says. “Now I can say, with a clear conscience, that I did everything I could to leave a better world for our kids.” 

– Frank Bures

• Read more stories from The Rotarian

https://www.rotary.org/en/rotarian-helps-clean-rivers-around-world

Rotary partners with Mediators Beyond Borders

Rotary partners with Mediators Beyond Borders to bring local solutions for lasting peace

EVANSTON, Ill. (Aug. 17, 2018) — Preventing conflicts from escalating into violent crises is 60 times more cost effective than intervening after violence erupts, according to the Carnegie Corporation of New York. A recent partnership between the membership service organization Rotary and Mediators Beyond Borders International (MBBI) aims to bring community-based solutions to prevent conflict in more communities.  

Rotary has worked with MBBI – an impact organization founded on the principle of people-centered peacebuilding – since 2013 to advance our common goals for peace. This new, partnership will enable Rotary members to train with MBBI to sharpen their mediation, dialogue and other conflict transformation skills. Rotary’s 1.2 million members, located in over 200 countries and regions, will help MBBI expand its network of trained mediators – potentially transforming conflict in communities not previously reached. 

“We are excited to continue our collaboration with MBBI to build local capacity for lasting peace in more communities,” said John Hewko, general secretary of Rotary International. “As trusted leaders attuned to the needs of their communities, Rotary members are well positioned to help find grassroots solutions to local conflicts.”

“We are honored to partner with Rotary and thereby enhance our ability to build a ‘peace able’ world through ‘service above self,’” said Prabha Sankaranarayan, CEO of MBBI. “At this critical moment in time, we tackle three major factors contributing to violent conflict in the world: the largest migration of populations in the history of mankind, climate change, and economic inequality. Together with Rotary International’s extraordinary global network of committed volunteers, we hope to have the dangerous dialogues and courageous conversations that can make a difference, that can not only prevent violent conflict but also build thriving communities.”

MBBI’s members are at the center of a movement for global peacebuilding through advocacy, capacity building and consultations.

Rotary members take action to address underlying causes of conflict by providing access to clean water and sanitation, supporting education, preventing and treating disease, saving mothers and children and growing local economies. More than $221 million has been awarded over the past several years through The Rotary Foundation to support these programs. 

MBBI joins a list of Rotary service partners including, Ashoka, Habitat for Humanity, the International Agency for the Prevention of Blindness, and Peace Corps

About Rotary: Rotary brings together a global network of volunteer leaders dedicated to tackling the world’s most pressing humanitarian challenges. Rotary connects 1.2 million members of more than 35,000 Rotary clubs in over 200 countries and geographical areas. Their work improves lives at both the local and international levels, from helping families in need in their own communities to working toward a polio-free world. 

About Mediators Beyond Borders International: MBBI’s mission is to build local skills for peace and promote mediation worldwide. Recognizing that the only lasting peace is the one built by those involved, MBBI advances the objectives of its 125 global partners by delivering services and enhancing skills for evidence-based context assessment, trauma-informed peacebuilding, post-conflict reconciliation and recovery, cross-sector and network collaboration, project design, implementation, evaluation and peacebuilding leadership that prioritizes the elevation of women and youth as leaders. Since 2007, more than 250 distinguished MBBI professional volunteer mediation, conflict transformation, trauma recovery and academic specialists have been catalyzing the success of local partners working to build a more peace “able” world in 33 countries on five continents. 

Contacts

Rotary: Chanele Williams 847-866-3466 chanele.williams@rotary.org  

MBBI: Steve Goldsmith ripartner@mediatorsbeyondborders.org 

https://www.rotary.org/en/rotary-partners-mediators-beyond-borders

Rotary gives millions in grants to fight polio 2018

Rotary announces US $96.5 million to end polio

EVANSTON, Ill. (August 15, 2018) — Rotary today announced nearly $100 million in grants to support the global effort to end polio, a vaccine-preventable disease that once paralyzed hundreds of thousands of children each year. 

The announcement comes as Nigeria marks two years without any reported cases of wild poliovirus, following four reported cases in 2016.

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“The fact that no new cases of wild poliovirus have been detected in Nigeria points to the improved surveillance and rapid response protocols Rotary and its Global Polio Eradication Initiative partners have established, particularly in insecure and inaccessible areas,” said Michael K. McGovern, chair of Rotary’s International PolioPlus Committee. “While this progress is promising, it’s time to redouble our efforts so we can continue to maintain the political and financial support necessary to end polio for good.”

While significant strides have been made against the paralyzing disease, wild poliovirus is still a threat in parts of the world, with 10 cases in Afghanistan and three cases in Pakistan this year so far. As long as a single child has polio, all children are at risk, which underscores the need for ongoing funding and political commitment to eradication.

To support polio eradication efforts in countries where polio remains endemic, Rotary is allocating the majority of the funds it announced today to Afghanistan ($22.9 million), Pakistan ($21.7 million), and Nigeria ($16.1 million). 

Further funding will support efforts to keep 12 vulnerable African countries polio-free:

  • Cameroon ($98,600)
  • Central African Republic ($394,400)
  • Chad ($1.71 million)
  • Democratic Republic of the Congo ($10.4 million)
  • Guinea ($527,300)
  • Madagascar ($690,000)
  • Mali ($923,200)
  • Niger ($85,300)
  • Sierra Leone ($245,300)
  • Somalia ($776,200)
  • South Sudan ($3.5 million)
  • Sudan ($2.6 million)

Africa will also see $5.8 million in funding for surveillance activities and $467,800 for technical assistance. Additional funding will go to Bangladesh ($504,200), Indonesia ($157,800), Myanmar ($197,200), and Nepal ($160,500), with an additional $96,300 funding surveillance in Southeast Asia. The remainder of the funding ($6.6 million) will go to the World Health Organization (WHO) for research activities.

Rotary has committed to raising $50 million a year to be matched 2-to-1 by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, yielding $450 for polio eradication activities over a three-year period. To date, Rotary has contributed more than $1.8 billion to fight the disease, including matching funds from the Gates Foundation, and countless volunteer hours since launching its polio immunization program, PolioPlus, in 1985. In 1988, Rotary became a core partner in the Global Polio Eradication Initiative with the WHO, UNICEF, and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The Gates Foundation later joined. Since the initiative launched, the incidence of polio has plummeted by more than 99.9 percent, from about 350,000 cases in 1988 to 22 confirmed in 2017. 

About Rotary

Rotary brings together a global network of community leaders dedicated to tackling the world’s most pressing humanitarian challenges. We connect 1.2 million members from more than 35,000 Rotary clubs in almost every country in the world. Their service improves lives both locally and internationally, from helping those in need in their own communities to working toward a polio-free world. Visit rotary.org and endpolio.org for more about Rotary and its efforts to eradicate polio.

Contact: Audrey Carl, audrey.carl@rotary.org, 847-866-3424


Pakistan turns badge of shame into success with new polio strategy. Read story.

https://www.rotary.org/en/rotary-gives-millions-grants-fight-polio-2018

2020 21 Rotary president selected

Sushil Kumar Gupta selected to be 2020-21 Rotary president

By Teresa Schmedding

Sushil Kumar Gupta, of the Rotary Club of Delhi Midwest, Delhi, India, is the selection of the Nominating Committee for President of Rotary International for 2020-21. He will be declared the president-nominee on 1 October if no challenging candidates have been suggested.

Gupta wants to increase Rotary’s humanitarian impact as well as the diversity of its membership.

“As individuals, we can only do so much,” Gupta said in a statement. “But when 1.2 million Rotarians work together, there is no limit to what we can achieve, and in the process, we can truly change the world.”

Gupta has been a Rotarian since 1977 and has served Rotary as district governor, training leader, and resource group adviser, and as a member, vice chair, or chair of several committees.

Sushil Kumar Gupta, of the Rotary Club of Delhi Midwest, Delhi, India, is the selection of the Nominating Committee for President of Rotary International for 2020-21. 

He was awarded an honorary Doctor of Science degree by the IIS University, Jaipur, in recognition of his contributions to water conservation.

He has also received the coveted Padma Shri Award, the fourth-highest civilian award in India, conferred by the president of India for distinguished service to tourism and social work.

Gupta has also received the Distinguished Service Award from The Rotary Foundation for his support of its humanitarian and educational programs. He and his wife, Vinita, are Major Donors to The Rotary Foundation and members of the Arch Klumph Society.

Gupta is chair and managing director of Asian Hotels (West) Ltd., and owner of Hyatt Regency Mumbai and JW Marriott Hotel New Delhi Aerocity. He has served as president of the Federation of Hotel and Restaurant Associations of India and on the board of directors of Tourism Finance Corporation of India Ltd. He is the president of Experience India Society, a public-private partnership between the tourism industry and the government of India that promotes India as a tourist destination. He is also vice chair of the Himalayan Environment Trust and serves on the board of Operation Eyesight Universal in India.

The members of the Nominating Committee for the 2020-21 President of Rotary International are Kazuhiko Ozawa, Rotary Club of Yokosuka, Kanagawa, Japan; Manoj D. Desai, Rotary Club of Baroda Metro, Gujarat, India; Shekhar Mehta, Rotary Club of Calcutta-Mahanagar, West Bengal, India; John G. Thorne, Rotary Club of North Hobart, Tasmania, Australia; Guiller E. Tumangan, Rotary Club of Makati West, Makati City, Philippines; Juin Park, Rotary Club of Suncheon, Jeonranam, Korea; Elio Cerini, Rotary Club of Milano Duomo, Italy; Gideon M. Peiper, Rotary Club of Ramat Hasharon, Israel; Per Høyen, Rotary Club of Aarup, Denmark; Paul Knijff, Rotary Club of Weesp (Vechtstreek-Noord), Netherlands; Sam Okudzeto, Rotary Club of Accra, Ghana; José Ubiracy Silva, Rotary Club of Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil; Bradford R. Howard, Rotary Club of Oakland Uptown, California, USA; Michael D. McCullough, Rotary Club of Trenton, Michigan, USA; Karen K. Wentz, Rotary Club of Maryville, Tennessee, USA; Michael K. McGovern, Rotary Club of South Portland-Cape Elizabeth, Maine, USA; and John C. Smarge, Rotary Club of Naples, Florida, USA.

https://www.rotary.org/en/2020-21-rotary-president-selected

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